warm-up

Home Boxing Workout - Sculpt A Knockout Body And Punch Off The Pounds

4 Round - Home Boxing Workout

Maybe you're not the fighting type, but here are some facts that will get you in the ring: Boxing blasts around 600 calories an hour while sculpting your arms, shoulders, core, and legs. And since nailing the punch sequences requires extreme focus, boxing is an excellent way to train your mind and body at once.

How it works: After the brief warm-up, do each round back to back with little or no rest in between. Repeat the full circuit (all 4 rounds) 1-3 times total.

Warm-Up: Jump Rope

3 minutes

Get your blood pumping with this traditional boxer's warm-up. Use a real jump rope if you have one handy, but if not, just imagine you're holding one.

 

Round 1: Jab, Cross, Jab, Bob and Weave

Reps: 10 per side

Stand with your right foot forward, arms in "guard" position (elbows bent, hands in fists on either side of your chin). Throw a right jab (quickly punch your right arm forward, rotating your fist down, without locking out your elbow), a left cross (punch your left arm forward, rotating your left hip into the punch and lifting your left heel off the floor), and then repeat a right jab. Bring arms back to guard, and quickly bob and weave from left to right by lowering into a squat as you circle your body from the back (lower left) to the front (lower right) (as if tracing a letter "U" with your upper body). Return to start. That's one rep.

Do 10 reps in a row as quickly as you can, and then switch your stance and do 10 reps on the other side.

Round 1: Boxer Pushups

Reps: 10

Start in full plank position with your hands directly below your shoulders, abs in tight. Lower your body until your chest is just a few inches above the floor. Press halfway up, then lower back to hover above from the floor. Press all the way back up to full plank. That's one rep.

Do 10 in a row with proper form, being careful not to let your hips sag or your back arch during the movement. Drop to your knees if it's too challenging.

Round 2: Double Jab, Cross, Jab, Cover

Reps: 10 per side

Stand with your right foot forward, arms on guard. Throw a double jab with your left arm by quickly doing two jabs in a row. Next, throw a right cross punch, then repeat a single jab on the left. Quickly "cover" (imagine you are trying to protect your torso from your opponent's punches) by twisting your upper body (hips stay still) and bringing your right elbow to your belly button. Immediately reverse to the left, and then repeat one more time to the right (the pace of this move is very quick, try counting "1, 2, 3" as you do it to keep your tempo up). Return to start. That's one rep.

Repeat 10 times in a row as quickly as you can, and then switch your stance and do 10 reps on the other side.

Round 2: Boxer Pushups

Reps: 10

Repeat the same movement you did during round one. If your form starts to fall apart, drop to your knees to complete the set.

Round 3: Jab, Cross, Hook, Bob and Weave

Reps: 10 per side

This combo is very similar to round one, except you'll add a new knockout punch: the hook. Start standing with your right foot forward, arms on guard. Throw a right jab, left cross, and then a right hook by keeping your elbow bent at 90 degrees and pivoting your right heel up as you rotate your right hip forward to power the punch (think of your fist swinging around the side of your opponent's face). Bring arms back to guard and quickly bob and weave from left to right, lowering into a squat as you circle your body from the back to the front. Return to start. That's one rep.

Repeat 10 times in a row as quickly as you can, and then switch your stance and do 10 reps on the other side.

Round 3: Boxer Bicycle Crunches

Reps: 20

Lie face-up with your knees bent into your chest, arms on guard. Lift your head, shoulders, and upper back off the ground and then perform a bicycle crunch by twisting your left shoulder toward your right knee, left leg extends out straight and parallel to (but not touching) the ground. Repeat to the other side. That's one rep.

Do 20 reps in a row (head stays lifted the entire time) as quickly as you can. Keep your belly button pulled in tight to your spine and your chin in towards your chest to maximize your belly burn and avoid neck strain.

Round 4: Jab, Cross, Upper, Cover

Reps: 10 per side

This combo introduces the fourth and final punch: the uppercut. Stand with your right foot forward, arms on guard. Throw a right jab, a left cross punch, then a right uppercut (bend your elbow into your body, rotate your right hip and heel, and imagine punching up and under your opponent's chin). Next, quickly repeat the cover move from round two by twisting your upper body and elbows to your left, right, and left (quickly counting "1, 2, 3" as you do it). Return to start. That's one rep.

Repeat 10 times in a row as quickly as you can, and then switch your stance and do 10 reps on the other side.

Round 4: Boxer Bicycle Crunches

Reps: 20

Do another set of boxer bicycle crunches, moving as quickly as you can with perfect form.

Cardio Finisher: Criss-Cross Jump Rope

3 to 5 minutes

To burn off any remaining energy (and calories!), grab your jump rope—real or imaginary—and do up to 5 minutes of criss-cross style jumping.

Finally, wind down with a few dynamic stretches.

AUTHOR: JESSICA SMITH @ SHAPE FITNESS

11 Most Common Myths On Fitness, Exercises And Workouts

1. When You Stop Working Out, Muscles Will Turn Into Fat

It’s the most typical workout myth in the world. Muscle has never and will never turn into fat and neither does fat turn into muscle. During weight training, more energy is required, hence a bigger appetite. When a person stops working out, the need for extra energy stops as well. But because the stomach size has increased due to a bigger appetite, the need to feel full has become a habit. Those extra calories that were once used as fuel while training is now stored as fat. It may seem like the bulk of muscle has turned into fat, but the truth is that the body became fatter due to eating more than previously needed.

Be it protein or carbohydrates, both turns into fat when not used. Cutting back on training requires you to cut back on food consumption as well.

2. Food Eaten After 8 At Night Will Turn Into Body Fat

Not entirely true. For people who workout during the later part of a day, it is important to eat accordingly. Whenever there is a need for the body to repair and rebuild, fuel is needed and the body most actively repairs during during sleep. However, it is more important to eat healthier foods during the later part of a day like lean meat, unsaturated fats, vegetables and fruits to avoid the risk of unwanted fat deposits. Give the body at least 2 hours to digest the food before going to bed.

3. Six Pack Abs Equal Six Hundred Sit Ups And Crunches Daily

Everyone has six pack abs. Abdominal exercises do not lead to clearly visible six pack abs but fat reduction does. The first place that fat goes to in the body, is the last place fat comes off (tummy for men and hips, butt, and thighs for women). Spot reduction of fat has never and will never work. A whole-body workout like cardio boxing is a great example of a fat reduction workout.

A six pack abs is a definite want for any man working out for it is a social muscle. Ab exercises will definitely strengthen and tone the abs but does not rid the fat. A better use of time would be to spend it on interval cardio sessions and making sure that proper food is fed to the body.

I actually have a personal digital body fat analyzer that I use from time to time that gives me a rough idea of my body’s current state. Accuracy may not be as good as a DXA but it’s good enough for me. You can easily get one at less than $US 10 from online auction sites like ebay.

4. Stretching And Warm Up Isn’t Necessary

I hit the gym everyday. And everyday I’ll take up 10 minutes to stretch and warm up my body from head to toe. It is necessary to avoid sprains and injuries. Even after a good day’s workout, I stretch. It greatly reduces the severity of DOMS, delayed onset muscle soreness, which will be pretty much appreciated the morning after.

5. Supplements Will Boost Muscle Growth And Strength In No Time

There are only 2 ways to make the most gains in mass and might.

  • A good training program.
  • A well planned out diet.

Time and energy should be focused on the 2 methods mentioned above rather than on supplements that claim to be able to bring out the Arnold in you. Some supplements may have serious and irreversible side effects if taken wrongly. For example, steroids taken wrongly may lead to a loss of appetite, constipation, intestinal irritation, vomiting, nose bleeding, headaches, increased aggression and even liver cancer. It’s way better to attain the results we want naturally. Think safe, think long term. Our body’s health should not be taken lightly.

6. Your Body Weakens With Age

It’s all in the mind. Think old and you’ll look old and act old. The fact is, exercise doesn’t only improve your physique and rejuvenates your spirit, but also gives you a healthy perspective on people and the world around. 

With regular exercise, training and a low-fat diet, you’ll gain increased energy levels, leaner body mass and an optimum body fat percentage. With the big 90 around the corner, people still do experience renewed strength, increased mobility, stronger bones and greater flexibility by exercising.

7. The Longer Time I Spend At The Gym, The Fitter I Become

It's different for each person, but for me, it’s no longer than 30 minutes 5 times a week with a 15 minute warmup and 15 core exercise and stretching at the end of the workout. The focus here is on efficiency and effectiveness that works every muscle in your body. An average bodybuilder does not spend more than 1 hour working out. People who just don’t have the time to workout that much will lose interest and motivation to exercise, if the myth were true. The point is, any exercise, at all, done correctly is better than none.

8. If I Don’t Feel Pain In The Morning, I Didn’t Work Out Hard Enough

When we exercise or lift weights, our muscle fibers will tear a little. Muscle soreness is expected, but normally heals within a week. Anything more than a week is an indication of over working out. Committing to a fitness program will eventually lead the muscle into getting used to it. Changing a fitness program regularly will ensure that all muscles are worked on and experiencing growth.

However, what happens in the gym is only meant to PROMOTE muscle growth. The REAL process begins only when a person is RECOVERING. Pain should not be used as a measurement of a workout session’s effectiveness. Some soreness, yes, but not pain. Always remember to stretch before and after. Get enough rest and work on different muscle groups on different days. Rest a day if the muscles are still sore.

9. Avoid Drinking Water When Your Body Is Over Heated

An average human body’s water content is 60% for men and 55% for women. In my body, 86 out of 143 pounds are water. If the body’s water content drops 5%, it’s already considered dehydration. An hour of vigorous exercise is enough to drain a quart (~1 liter). Drinking before, during and after is pretty important.

During exercise, muscles generate heat that will cause a rise in body temperature. This heat is doused by water when it is carried in the bloodstream and pushed to the surface as bullets of sweat. It continues to drain water from the body until it is replenished. Thirst is already a sign of dehydration. Drinking water keeps the muscles oiled and the body productive. Here's how much water should you drink.

10. The Prime Time For Exercising And Working Out Is In The Mornings

Correction. The best time to exercise is the time that works with the individual’s body clock and fits their busy days. People working out in the morning are more likely to stick to their fitness plans as they are able to get it in before the various demands of life compete for their time.

Many, many people believe that the best way to lose fat is to start pushing your body right after waking up in the mornings, on an empty stomach. I say no. Exercise is meant for toning the muscle and burning fat. Inability to draw energy from the main source will only force the body to go to other sources of energy, which are your muscles and fat. More muscles are used up as fuel as their composition is much simpler compared to fat.

11. It Is Okay To Cover A Week’s Worth Of Workout During The Weekend

It’s much better spreading a workout all over the week instead of pounding the body during weekends. A weekend warrior will lose out on other health benefits. Blood pressure and glucose levels are temporarily lowered during each exercise, which are beneficial in the long run. Exercising regularly also keeps a person’s appetite consistent.

 

The Best Ways To Prepare Before I Go To A Boxing Gym

Boxing is a tough, rigorous and physically demanding sport. Like any other sport, you wouldn't simply step into the ring and expect to compete. The training program alone at serious boxing gyms requires you to possess a certain level fitness, with proficiency in several key areas. Before you go to a boxing gym, prepare yourself by developing endurance, agility, strength and quickness. These attributes will allow you to focus on the basics of boxing during your first session rather than playing fitness catch-up.

Might as Well Jump

One of the most important physical attributes that you need to develop before training at a boxing gym is agility and coordination, especially combining the motions of your upper body with those of your lower body. Jumping rope is one of the exercises that boxers use to achieve that coordination. When you go to a boxing gym, you'll jump rope frequently and at a high rate of speed. Practice with a jump rope every day to get familiar with the exercise. Work your way up to three minutes of continuous jumping. Do six three-minute sessions, resting no more than one minute between sessions.

Go the Distance

To build endurance, boxers do “road work” - long distance running. You can increase your mileage gradually and at the same time periodically elevate your heart rate by performing basic intervals. Begin by jogging at a comfortable pace for two minutes, then sprint for 40 seconds. Jog for another two minutes, then sprint for another 40 seconds. Continue this pattern for 20 minutes if possible. If you cannot do 20 minutes of intervals, scale back to 10 minutes. If 20 minutes is too easy, extend the total time. Do these intervals three to four times each week. To avoid injury, increase your total mileage by no more than 10 percent per week.

Stay Strong

To develop power, you must develop strength. Many boxers take a balanced approach to strength training, blending body weight exercises such as push-ups, pull-ups and sit-ups - performed at high intensity - with weightlifting exercises such as squats, deadlifts, bench presses and lat pull-downs. Begin a strength-training program several weeks before you head to a boxing gym. Train three days per week, using a full-body routine - working out all of your major muscle groups in each session. Space your lifting workouts so there is at least one rest day in between sessions.

Sleight of Hand

Shadowboxing is one of the simplest ways to develop familiarity with the basic mechanics of punching with speed. Position a lamp behind you, shut off all other lights in the room and let the lamp cast your shadow on the wall in front of you. Practice punching against your shadow, keeping your punches tight and efficient. Practice pushing off the ground with your feet as you throw your punches, transferring that power from your lower body up through your back, shoulders, arms and fists, as fast as you can. Do this twice a day every day. Over a few weeks, you should develop increased hand speed that will help you transition to work with the speed bag and heavy bag at the boxing gym.

AUTHOR: BOBBY @ LIVESTRONG

Warm-Up Exercises for Boxing

Boxing is an intense sport that requires maximum effort from its participants. To get your body ready for boxing, you should always warm up before training or a fight. A boxer's warm-up should be general so that it prepares the muscles and organs for the bout, but also specific for practicing the skills needed in the ring.

Jump Rope

Jumping rope is a familiar exercise to most boxers. Jumping rope will raise your core temperature, elevate your heart and breathing rate and get you ready for more strenuous warm-up exercises to follow. Start jumping rope with your feet together before progressing on to an alternating heel to toe action and running on the spot with high knees. Finish off by two rope turns per jump - an exercise called, "double unders". Continue jumping rope for 5 to 10 minutes before moving on to the next part of your warm-up.

Boxers will typically jump rope for about 10-15 minutes (3 rounds continuous without rest) as warm-up before their boxing workouts. If you can’t do 3 rounds, start with 3 minutes as your goal, then work your way up.
— ExpertBoxing

Duck Under/Step Over

Stand with your feet together and your hands by your sides. Imagine there is a hip-high barrier immediately to your left. Raise your left leg and step over the imaginary barrier and immediately follow with your right leg. Next, move to your right and duck under the barrier. Try to get as low to the ground as you can and duck your head. Repeat this over/under maneuver for 5 to 10 reps before reversing direction.

Shadow Boxing

Shadow boxing provides you with the opportunity to practice your boxing skills before throwing any punches against an opponent. Start off by throwing single jabs and crosses before adding hooks and uppercuts, building up to throwing multiple punch combinations. Practice your footwork while throwing combinations as though you were attacking, evading and counterpunching a real opponent. Try to increase the speed of your punches.

Pad Work

Finish your boxing warm-up by throwing combinations of punches into hook and jab pads held by your trainer or sparring partner. Start by making light contact with the pads and increase the speed and power of your punches over a few minutes. To sharpen your reactions, have your partner throw light noncontact punches toward you to evade. Only perform enough pad work to finish your warm-up and avoid doing so much that you begin to fatigue before the bout begins.

AUTHOR: PATRICK @ LIVESTRONG